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Chimney Swift (NY) — 2008

Chimney Swift

Location: Glenham, NY

Hosted by: http://www.falconsandfriends.com/


Nest Build. Date: Jun 01, 2008

First Egg Date: Jun 13, 2008

Clutch Size: 4

Incubation: Jun 17, 2008

Hatch Date: Jul 04, 2008

Number of Nestlings: 4

Fledge Date: Jul 24, 2008

Number of Fledglings: 4


Note: Video Highlight of feeding one of the young!


Photo Highlights (61)

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/brd_chimney_swift_400.jpg
    Hoping

    May 16, 2008 -
    What we are hoping for is a pair of Chimney Swifts to nest in this tower. The pair will build a nest of loosely woven twigs cemented together with the bird's glue-like saliva.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008May30-07.29.33.jpg
    The swifts have arrived!

    May 30, 2008 -
    The swifts have completed their long migration from South America and have arrived in Glenham, NY!

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun02-12.39.47.jpg
    Nests.

    Jun 02, 2008 -
    In searching for a potential nesting site, darkness and shelter from the elements are the prime determinants. Before the European settlement of North America, swifts nested primarily in hollow trees and caves. They quickly adapted to nesting in man-made structures such as chimneys.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun03-14.15.24.jpg
    Nest building.

    Jun 03, 2008 -
    Twigs are cemented to a vertical surface with saliva produced from the glands located under the Chimney Swift's tongue. The exact chemical composition of this saliva is still unknown!

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun04-09.16.15.jpg
    Perch?

    Jun 04, 2008 -
    As you can see, Chimney Swifts do not sit on perches like other birds. Instead, they use their long claws to cling to vertical surfaces.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun05-06.33.36.jpg
    Tail feathers.

    Jun 05, 2008 -
    The Chimney Swift has short, stiff, spine-tipped tail feathers that help support itself on vertical surfaces. Woodpeckers have similarly structured tail feathers.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun06-13.45.50.jpg
    Nest.

    Jun 06, 2008 -
    On average, Chimney Swift nests are 5.0-7.5cm wide x 10cm long x 2.5-3.1cm deep.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun08-17.41.06.jpg
    Close-up.

    Jun 08, 2008 -
    There is no distinguishable plumage difference between male and female Chimney Swifts.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun08-04.41.34.jpg
    Copulation.

    Jun 08, 2008 -
    Copulation usually occurs at the nest during the nest building stage. Prior to copulation, the male makes a few Chipper notes before crawling onto the females back. He flutters his wings and stays in the copulatory position for 2-4 seconds.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun09-08.29.42.jpg
    Still building...

    Jun 09, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts have a unique aerial display called V-ing which occurs more frequently after pair formation. One swift will fly behind another and will abruptly thrust its wings upwards, creating an acute angle to its body.The leading bird may or may not perform this display.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun11-16.12.29.jpg
    Still building...

    Jun 11, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts are social birds. During migration, they sometimes roost in flocks of greater than 5,000 birds! Also, birds who remain unmated during the summer often roost together.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008June13.jpg
    First egg!

    Jun 13, 2008 -
    Egg-laying starts when the nest is only half way done. More twigs and saliva are added to the nest during incubation for reinforcement.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun14-12.52.07.jpg
    Egg laying.

    Jun 14, 2008 -
    Usually, eggs are laid every other day, however, different patterns have been observed.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun14-19.32.20.jpg
    Copulation.

    Jun 14, 2008 -
    Copulation usually occurs at the nest but can sometimes occur midair!

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun15-09.45.57.jpg
    Two eggs!

    Jun 15, 2008 -
    Each egg is approximately 7.6% of the female's body mass.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun16-17.41.38.jpg
    Incubation.

    Jun 16, 2008 -
    Incubation usually begins when the second to last egg is laid and lasts an average of 19 days. Incubation is a shared responsibility- both male and female incubate the eggs!

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun17-05.00.18.jpg
    Both parents on the nest.

    Jun 17, 2008 -
    During incubation, the nest is constantly attended to by at last one of the parents.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun17-07.06.59.jpg
    Three eggs.

    Jun 17, 2008 -
    The average clutch size is four eggs.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun18-09.32.56.jpg
    Habitat.

    Jun 18, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts nest in a various environments. Breeding areas are more concentrated in urban areas where there are more artificial nesting sites available. Their range does not spread far up into Canada, a possible reason for this is that farther North there are less potential nesting sites.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun19-07.44.19.jpg
    Four eggs!

    Jun 19, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts are able to begin breeding at one year of age. Afterwards, they breed annually.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun20-16.49.50.jpg
    Cool facts.

    Jun 20, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts fly at an average of 46.5km/hr and have been seen at above the clouds at altitudes of 2,134m!!

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun23-12.32.35.jpg
    Agnostic behavior.

    Jun 23, 2008 -
    In general, Chimney Swifts rarely are aggressive toward others of their own species, even when competing for nesting cavities. Chasing is common during mating season.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun25-02.06.44.jpg
    Rainy days.

    Jun 25, 2008 -
    It's been cold and rainy the past couple days- this could potentially lengthen incubation.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun27-11.55.24.jpg
    Hatching.

    Jun 27, 2008 -
    Hatching could potentially begin in the next few days, but it has been cold and wet, which may extend incubation a few days. Once hatching begins, it is entirely asynchronous. Two eggs may hatch one day, and the next may hatch 3 days later!

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/swifttower.jpg
    The Tower

    Jun 28, 2008 -
    Although Chimney Swifts apparently nested in hollow trees and perhaps caves before European settlement of North America, they quickly adapted to nesting in chimneys and other artificial sites.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/swifttower.jpg
    The Tower

    Jun 28, 2008 -
    Although Chimney Swifts apparently nested in hollow trees and perhaps caves before European settlement of North America, they quickly adapted to nesting in chimneys and other artificial sites.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jun29-16.14.31.jpg
    Wing stretch.

    Jun 29, 2008 -
    Still incubating....keep an eye out, hatching very soon!

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul01-09.36.38.jpg
    Preening.

    Jul 01, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts preen frequently; before and after leaving the nest, and before and after copulation.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul03-05.19.32.jpg
    Soon...

    Jul 03, 2008 -
    Not a lot is known about the predators of these birds. Black rat snakes and raccoons do pose somewhat of a threat to eggs.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/Feeding two_2008july05-11.02.png
    Feeding two - One is a 4th of July baby

    Jul 05, 2008 -
    One Swift hatched on the 4th and the other on the 5th. See video highlights for a clip of the two getting a feeding. Both parents feed the nestlings. During first week after hatch average a feeding every 30 minutes.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul04-13.51.png
    Four Days Post-hatching

    Jul 08, 2008 -
    The nestlings have sharp claws which enable them to cling to the nest. During the first 10 days the chicks will increase in body mass 10- to 12-fold from 1.0-1.5 g at hatching to 60-80% of adult weight, 14.5-21.5 g. See feeding video.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul04-13.51.png
    Four Days Post-hatching

    Jul 08, 2008 -
    The nestlings have sharp claws which enable them to cling to the nest. During the first 10 days the chicks will increase in body mass 10- to 12-fold from 1.0-1.5 g at hatching to 60-80% of adult weight, 14.5-21.5 g. See feeding video.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul12-closeup.jpg
    Feathers Erupt

    Jul 12, 2008 -
    Feathers erupt through skin by days 6-8 for this spcies. Also the egg tooth is resorbed by day 8. View feeding video highlight to see more

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul12-closeup.jpg
    Feathers Erupt

    Jul 12, 2008 -
    Feathers erupt through skin by days 6-8 for this spcies. Also the egg tooth is resorbed by day 8. View feeding video highlight to see more

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul15-15.05.39.jpg
    Brooding.

    Jul 15, 2008 -
    Both parents continuously brood the nestlings until they are 6 days old. These nestlings are almost 8-12 days old, so the amount of time spent brooding has decreased. Brooding ceases entirely when the nestlings become too large for both parents to cover them.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul15-00.11.30.jpg
    Both parents brooding.

    Jul 15, 2008 -

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul16-16.22.45.jpg
    Feeding.

    Jul 16, 2008 -
    Both parents feed the nestlings by regurgitating directly into their mouths.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul17.png
    Practice Flapping

    Jul 17, 2008 -
    The nestlings will exercise by practice flapping while clinging to the nest and later the tower wall. Remiges (flight feathers) emerge from their sheaths about days 10-12. See video clip.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul17.png
    Practice Flapping

    Jul 17, 2008 -
    The nestlings will exercise by practice flapping while clinging to the nest and later the tower wall. Remiges (flight feathers) emerge from their sheaths about days 10-12. See video clip.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul20-23.47.54.jpg
    Hanging out.

    Jul 20, 2008 -
    Most Chimney Swifts leave the nest to perch beside it at around 19 days of age. However, larger broods leave the nest earlier. These nestlings left the nest at around 15-16 days of age.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul21-14.42.03.jpg
    First flight.

    Jul 21, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts usually take their first flight 28-30 days after hatching.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul24_18-37-51.png
    THE First Flight

    Jul 24, 2008 -
    See video highlight to view the clip. Thanks Glenham once again for sending great clips!

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul28-02.14.53.jpg
    View from above.

    Jul 28, 2008 -

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul28-02.14.53.jpg
    View from above.

    Jul 28, 2008 -
    Counting 7 birds. See video highlight of practice flying.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Jul29-14.46.00.jpg
    Leaving the nest.

    Jul 29, 2008 -
    Once the nestlings leave the nest, the parents cease feeding them. Even if they return to the same nest to roost, the parents do not feed them. See video highlight of practice flying.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug01-13.49.55.jpg
    Predation.

    Aug 01, 2008 -
    Black rat snakes are the only known nest predator of the Chimney Swift, but other birds, such as the Sharp-shinned hawk and Mississippi Kites,have been known to take Chimney Swifts as prey items.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug01-13.49.55.jpg
    Predation.

    Aug 01, 2008 -
    Black rat snakes are the only known nest predator of the Chimney Swift, but other birds, such as the Sharp-shinned hawk and Mississippi Kites,have been known to take Chimney Swifts as prey items.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/20080803_swift_0001.jpg
    Chimney Swift : still feeding one of the young

    Aug 03, 2008 -
    One of the Chimney Swift young being fed. See video highlight.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/20080803_swift_0001.jpg
    Chimney Swift : still feeding one of the young

    Aug 03, 2008 -
    One of the Chimney Swift young being fed. See video highlight.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug04-18.45.15.jpg
    Life span.

    Aug 04, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts are capable of living for up to 15 years, however, the average life span is approximately 5 years. Other than predation, Chimney Swifts are susceptible to anything that decreases the abundance of insects. During migration, storms can sweep away entire flocks.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug04-18.45.15.jpg
    Life span.

    Aug 04, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts are capable of living for up to 15 years, however, the average life span is approximately 5 years. Other than predation, Chimney Swifts are susceptible to anything that decreases the abundance of insects. During migration, storms can sweep away entire flocks.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug07-16.43.55.jpg
    In flight.

    Aug 07, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts fly almost all the time- they even fly when they are bathing! Their flight is fast and erratic, giving the illusion that only one wing is moving at a time. This, however, is false, both wings do beat simultaneously.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug07-16.43.55.jpg
    In flight.

    Aug 07, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts fly almost all the time- they even fly when they are bathing! Their flight is fast and erratic, giving the illusion that only one wing is moving at a time. This, however, is false, both wings do beat simultaneously.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug11-05.25.30.jpg
    Chimneys.

    Aug 11, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts are protected by federal law under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act. However, chimney sweeps still pose a threat to these birds. A single chimney sweep has been known to kill 100 birds in one season. Maintaining your chimney is the best way to prevent nestings swifts.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug12-00.01.38.jpg
    Roosts.

    Aug 12, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts often use old nest sites for large communal roosts. Darkness is the stimulus to enter a roost; once the sun starts to set birds will enter the roost, and once the sun begins to rise they will leave.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug12-00.01.38.jpg
    Roosts.

    Aug 12, 2008 -
    Chimney Swifts often use old nest sites for large communal roosts. Darkness is the stimulus to enter a roost; once the sun starts to set birds will enter the roost, and once the sun begins to rise they will leave.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug15-02.01.55.jpg
    Huddling.

    Aug 15, 2008 -
    It has been unusually cold in New York the past few nights. These eight birds are huddling together to conserve heat.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug15-02.01.55.jpg
    Huddling.

    Aug 15, 2008 -
    It has been unusually cold in New York the past few nights. These eight birds are huddling together to conserve heat.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug24-00.02.12.jpg
    Roosting

    Aug 24, 2008 -
    One of the last nights we've seen a group roosting in the tower. This long distance migrant heads through e. Mexico and Central America to winter in Peru, n. Chile, and nw. Brazil

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug25-05.58.51.jpg
    Chimney Swifts still using the box

    Aug 25, 2008 -
    Some of the chimney swifts continue to use the nest box at this point. Mostly, it's for safe use during the night. This is a good picture of those long wings that are so good for agility.

  • http://warbler.ornith.cornell.edu/nest-cam-highlights/2008/NY-Buffalo/buffalo2008Aug27-00.46.36.jpg
    Very Last Swift

    Aug 27, 2008 -
    This is the last sighting of any of the swifts swifts for the breeding season. They're all getting ready for the winter now. This little guy is spending one last night in this box.

Video Highlights (18)


Jun 23, 2008 - Wet

Open movie

Jun 26, 2008 - Rotating the eggs
Rotating the eggs keeps them all at the same temperature and prevents the embryo from sticking to the inside wall of the eggshell.

Open movie

Jun 30, 2008 - Exiting the Tower
Don't blink, this happens fast!

Open movie

Jun 30, 2008 - Changing of the Guard - Incubation by both parents
Both parents incubate. Typically one parent won't leave until the other is there to replace it.

Open movie

Jul 05, 2008 - Feeding Two
One Swift hatched on the 4th and the other on the 5th. Here the two are getting a feeding by one of the parents.

Open movie

Jul 05, 2008 - Feeding Two
One Swift hatched on the 4th and the other on the 5th. Here the two are getting a feeding by one of the parents.

Open movie

Jul 08, 2008 - Feeding time!

Open movie

Jul 09, 2008 - Feeding time!

Open movie

Jul 12, 2008 - Feeding the nestlings
Great feeding clip as the nestlings hang perilously over the edge of the nest.

Open movie

Jul 12, 2008 - Feeding the nestlings
Great feeding clip as the nestlings hang perilously over the edge of the nest.

Open movie

Jul 17, 2008 - Flapping Practice

Open movie

Jul 17, 2008 - Flapping Practice

Open movie

Jul 24, 2008 - THE First Flight

Open movie

Jul 29, 2008 - More Practice Flying
They have spent much of these two weeks out of the nest exercising by flapping their wings and taking short flights in the tower. Once they depart they will be able to fly well.

Open movie

Jul 29, 2008 - More Practice Flying
They have spent much of these two weeks out of the nest exercising by flapping their wings and taking short flights in the tower. Once they depart they will be able to fly well.

Open movie

Aug 03, 2008 - Chimney Swift : still feeding one of the young

Open movie

Aug 03, 2008 - Chimney Swift : still feeding one of the young

Open movie